Book Recommendations

Looking for a good investment book?

Wondering What Books You Can Read In Your Investment Journey? Improve your value investing skills through these books.

Here are some of our favourites:

BASIC – TIME TO DO SOME INVESTING LEGWORK
Invest Lah! The Average Joe’s Guide To Investing Ser Jing, Sudhan, Wei Lin
One Up On Wall Street Peter Lynch
The Five Rules for Successful Stock Investing Pat Dorsey
Rich Dad Poor Dad Robert Kiyosaki
Show Me the Money Teh Hooi Ling
The Education of a Value Investor: My Transformation Quest for Wealth, Wisdom and Enlightenment Guy Spier
The Little Book that Builds Wealth  Pat Dorsey
The Little Book that Beats the Market Joel Greenblatt
The Value Investors: Lessons from the World’s Top Fund Managers Ronald W. Chan

 

INTERMEDIATE – WHEN THINGS GET SERIOUS
Beating the Street Peter Lynch
Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits and Other Writings Philip Fisher
Competition Demystified: A Radically Simplified Approach to Business Strategy Bruce Greenwald and Judd Kahn
Fooling Some of the People All of the Time David Einhorn
John Neff on Investing John Neff
Margin of Safety  Seth Klarman
Poor Charlies’s Almanac Bruce Greenwald and Judd Kahn
Quality of Earnings Thornton L. O’Glove
The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America Warren Buffett and Lawrence Cunningham
The Intelligent Investor Benjamin Graham
The Manual of Ideas: The Proven Framework for Finding the Best Value Investments John Mihaljevic
Value Investing: From Graham to Buffett and Beyond Bruce Greenwald

 

ADVANCED – YOUR INVESTING GAME IS STRONG
Security Analysis Benjamin Graham and David Dodd
The Most Important Thing Howard Marks
The Outsiders: Eight Unconventional CEOs and Their Radically Rational
Blueprint for Success
 William Thorndike
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NON-INVESTMENT BOOKS THAT WORTH YOUR TIME
Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion Robert B.Cialdini
How to Win Friends and Influence People Dale Carnegie
Think and Grow Rich  Napolean Hill
Way To Wealth  Benjamin Franklin
 –

 

What other books do you think should be on this list? Do let us know below!


Any other books you think should be on our list? Let us know right here or in the comments below!

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7 thoughts on “Book Recommendations

  • March 22, 2018 at 12:56 pm
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    I disagree with the book “The Five Rules for Successful Stock Investing” by Pat Dorsey being placed in the Advanced category. I believe it should be placed in the Basic category because this was the one and only book that clarified everything about Stock Investing process, Stock analysis, Stock Investing pitfalls and what to avoid, to me when I was completely new and ignorant and scouted everywhere for a book that could teach the basics to a novice. No jargon, no hype … just a very sensible, mature, clear, concise and simplified manner of explaining, with real-life examples. Easy to understand for anyone who is a novice and completely new to Equities Investing.
    To categorise this book as “Advanced” would be to deny a novice of picking this book as a first book to learn about Equities Investing, and that would be a real shame. Believe me, I am speaking from personal experience.

    Reply
  • March 18, 2018 at 7:28 pm
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    Seconded on The Outsiders! Fantastic read on how management should be allocating capital.

    My recommendations:

    Asian Godfathers by Joe Studwell – gives you more history/context of how the current billionaires build their wealth in the Singapore/Hong Kong context, especially on SEA real estate industry

    Adding on quality of earnings, i found these books to be particularly helpful as well;

    Asian Financial Statement Analysis: Detecting Financial Irregularities ( case studies are mostly centered around Singapore stocks. Recommended )

    Creative Cashflow Reporting: Uncovering sustainable financial performance

    It’s Earnings That Count: Finding Stocks with Earnings Power for Long-Term Profits

    Financial Shenanigans: How to Detect Accounting Gimmicks & Fraud in Financial Reports

    The Art of Short Selling

    What’s Behind the Numbers?: A Guide to Exposing Financial Chicanery and Avoiding Huge Losses in Your Portfolio ( bit of a dense read but decent overall )

    However, i disagree on Competition Demystified. My understanding is that Greenwald is essentially saying competition is bad for business, a monopoly or duopoly would be ideal to earn higher returns than say oligopolies.

    Sounds great in theory but in reality not so good. Because they are the incumbents, there is no incentive to maximize for”higher returns” . Take a look at the financial statements of “monopolies” and “duopolies” in Singapore.

    Singtel, M1, Starhub and Circlelife – they don’t really differ that much in terms of performance

    Singpost – network advantage but languishing because of poor management

    UOB, DBS and OCBC – numbers don’t really differ much from each other either.

    i would argue it is a misleading book when you try to apply the framework; Michael porter’s approach is still the way to go when evaluating “moats”.

    Reply
  • November 30, 2017 at 5:50 pm
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    Love your contents, thanks for sharing. Just one minor typo error for “Cale Carnegie”

    Reply
  • July 10, 2015 at 10:15 am
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    Hi Carlos,
    Thank you for your interests, you can email us at info@valueinvestasia.com to discuss more.
    Thanks.

    VIA

    Reply

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